Tuesday, July 10, 2012

a sudden joyous turn.

"I  talked to (my sons) about eucatastrophe. It’s a word Tolkien coined in his essay 'On Fairy Stories' which means, basically, the opposite of catastrophe. He calls eucatastrophe the 'sudden joyous turn.' It’s that moment when all seems lost, when evil seems to have finally overcome every good thing, when the hero can go no further. Then light prevails against the darkness. The good guys win.

When you’re writing a story, like I am now, you realize that there’s not much story if there’s nothing at stake. If there’s no evil, no enemy, no point at which the hero is at the end of his rope, then the thing falls flat for some reason. But if we want the good guys to win (and almost universally we do), why do we put our heroes through so much? Because we grow into what we are meant to be by walking through the fire.

I told the boys about how the story of Jesus’ resurrection is the ultimate eucatastrophe. When Jesus, the perfect man, God made flesh, cries out and exhales his dying breath, the sky is black and roiling, the ground shakes, the dead emerge from their tombs and haunt Jerusalem, and the sheep scatter. But Sunday morning, more than just the sun rises. Everything changes. It’s not just a story, it’s the story. A sudden joyous turn, indeed."

Read the rest here.

1 comment:

  1. LOVE this. Love love love this. God is soooooo good. This inspired me and I have already shared it with two people today :)

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